‘Shorts – a take on poetry’ transition made

Misread He takes in the view all the lines and spaces curves and wiggles traced their flow and punctuation top to bottom footnotes nothing hidden from him He turns the pages over no choice she made him dense close packed tension no clarity or meaning she too complicated for him too deep too dark he leaves # She wrote stories he couldn't read‘Shorts – a take on poetry’ the first book of my transition from scientist to writer will be published in May by Potter’s Grove Press. Writing poetry came as a surprise to me. I’d a novel in mind, ‘Believing Sight Unseen,’ it still is; competing hard with the immediacy of poetry.

 I started writing late, creatively, that is. Until 2012 I wrote disciplined non-fiction, lived a scientist’s life of peer review and publication. I worked at boundaries; of the physical and life sciences, of industry and academia, of research and mentoring, of observation and extrapolation. 2012 to 2017 the transition made, not easily, not smoothly, easing out of science, finding my way to write. 

 Turned out my approach to writing not so different to the way I did science – a little unconventional – using words in place of molecules to explore boundaries; real, imagined, of my mind and yours. In short, PowerPoint bullet points became verse – I like to keep things tight.

EDC Writing – Imagined Real

Beaconsfield to Marylebone

Maidenhead to Paddington

Windsor to Waterloo

lines in, and out again

Exeter from all begun

Devon left, half century on

 

River Thames meandering

fields beside, counties bridged

Buckinghamshire, Berkshire views

English ways, getting there

London, underground, overground

buses, walking, taxi hailed

 

Platformed faces, street eyes, busy

the suit, the dress, jeans, short skirts

all shapes, legs that go on, and on

smiles, few since the Olympics, wrong

seats offered, asked if okay, hand held

strangers, friends, would be lovers, strays

 

Wake, early morning, kettle on, need tea

still dark, recalled, sub-conscious scenes

write, behind the eyes to laptop screen

edit, rarely, as is, simple, concise, rhythmic

interpretation, your mind, what you see

life, relationships, imagined, real

Creating Atmosphere In Fiction – by Esther Chilton

An excellent guest post by Esther Chilton – I’m slightly nervous writing this as Esther is my editor – a mistake here and there could create an atmosphere – but there never is with Esther – okay the odd well disguised sigh maybe!

Hugh's Views & News  

Today, I’m delighted to welcome Esther Chilton to my blog.

While I’m putting the finishing touches to my next short story collection, Esther kindly accepted my invitation to write a guest post. This is a must-read for anyone who is in the process of writing fiction, whether it is for an upcoming book, competition, for publication in a magazine, or as a blog post.  Esther gives lots of great writing advice and tips over on her blog.

#writingtips #writing #authors Image Credit: Pixabay

To be successful, a short story or novel needs to develop a strong sense of atmosphere. This draws your readers into your story so they can imagine this world you are creating. It also sets up expectations for them and gives them information about the characters they’re likely to meet in your story.

Here are some ways to help you ensure your readers feel as if they’re right there alongside your…

View original post 1,270 more words