EDC Review: Footsteps of the Templar by Lucy Brazier

Russians digging up ‘his garden’. The Bursar’s doing. No wonder The Dean a little cranky, that is a little more than usual! Footsteps of the Templar, the fourth of the PorterGirl novels, brings once more together; strange Fellows, Porters of all levels, the Heads of much put upon Kitchen and Laundry, the Police, one mounted, one an accomplice to a Wedding, and, the French a new dimension – and did I mention cats, I think I’d better. Yes, Old College as we know it, or think we do, well does anyone, and what do the French have to do with such an English institution? The plot, well stitched, no loose ends, no holes other than, that is, The Bursar’s. Third person narration, we see inside the minds of all, beyond Deputy Head Porter’s perception good as that has always been; we now know what Head Porter is thinking, a certain Headmistress, I didn’t know he had it in him! Lucy Brazier writes with a light, engaging touch; mischievous, at times eccentric, with humour and sensitivity, all beautifully balanced. A class act this author, she’ll have you smiling, beginning to the end, and wanting to read again.

 

 

PorterGirl 4 -Footsteps of the Templar

Ah, the ‘real’ news of the day from the UK!

Lucy Brazier

Available now to pre-order

‘A Peculiar Type Of Morality’

Head Porter’s hopes for a quiet life are dashed not only by the return to Old College of one of academia’s most controversial Fellows, but also the revelation that the Knights Templar may once have left behind something quite important in the College grounds. As Deputy Head Porter and The Dean mount a typically ill-considered investigation, knowledge of this esoteric legend had already fallen into dangerous hands…
Abandoning Head Porter to deal with a College wedding, a mysterious big hole, troublesome felines and a potentially murderous Bursar, Deputy Head Porter leads The Dean and the highly unpredictable Professor Horatio Fox in a race against time to solve puzzles, crack codes and follow a trail that takes them to the very heart of the legend of the Knights Templar – an ancient chateau in Chinon, France.
Coincidentally, this is exactly where DCI…

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EDC Review: Sinister Dexter by Lucy Brazier

 

PorterGirl: Sinister Dexter by [Brazier, Lucy]

‘Sinister Dexter’ the third of the Porter Girl novels is an immensely enjoyable read ; all the more so having read the two that came before – ‘First Lady of the Keys’ and ‘The Vanishing Lord’.  Author Lucy Brazier sets all eyes upon Deputy Head Porter as she strives to uphold the honour of Old College – despite the machinations of The Bursar – jeopardising her position and even more alarming her need of tea.  Two young bodies found at the bottom of the Old College garden, quite disturbing, unsettling the students, the staff, to a degree, not least the ever present Dean – though in his case tempered by having to yet again indulge the police. Deputy Head Porter finds herself the go-between (and all too often the go-without when it comes to tea and sausages) – the link of reason (all things are relative) – dealing with the ‘never wrong, yet not quite right’ Dean, the ‘all seeing, all hearing’ Detective Chief Inspector Thompson, and the’ distracted, not always there’ Head Porter – to name a few! And therein lies the beauty of this story – the interplay of characters, the creation of images, the deft balance of sensitivities, emotions, humour and the bizarre – all sublime – and best of all exposure to what goes on in Deputy Head Porter’s mind! I’ve a mind to read again and will.

EDC Review: The PorterGirl Novels by Lucy Brazier

 

Exciting times – the third PorterGirl novel ‘Sinister Dexter’ by Lucy Brazier to be published on 27th April. Here’s my take on the first two novels – both a joy to read.

‘A literary phenomenon I believe’

EDC review – November 2016

A debut, a blog become novel, imaginative fiction underpinned by unique experience, a literary phenomenon I believe. Lucy Brazier, an author to look out for. No spoilers here, her guile layering intrigue, mystery, tension, threat and the bizarre laced with humour all the more enjoyable, more involving, more gob-smacking good  when you think you know but don’t know what’s coming. Lucy tells a very good story. A woman, against the odds, Deputy Head Porter, the first of her kind amongst Fellows of Old College, a world steeped in tradition and when deemed appropriate,  the darker arts. She’s dressed the part, bowler hat atop buttoned curves, not unnoticed, but more an inquisitive mind, kindness live-wired, and the disturbed peculiar give cause to fear for her. Atmospheric prose create images of tranquillity, touching philosophical moments have you thinking too, then with a quite literal ‘bugger this’ she’ll take you places she can’t resist, but decidedly  best not for her to be.  I thoroughly enjoyed this, the first of the  PorterGirl novels, may they long continue, and Lucy have the success her talent deserves.

‘Tea, whisky, secrets and mischievous ways’

EDC review – June 2017

In ‘The Vanishing Lord’ the second of the PorterGirl novels  Deputy Head Porter has found her feet – even when disguised as a flighty girl in killer heels!  So many scenes Lucy has brought to life in her inimitable way, framed and hung around a missing painting … with a touch of medieval spice … don’t ask just read!  Deputy Head Porter, bowler hat and waistcoat her usual attire, the ‘first lady of the keys’ at Old College,  a world of doors and gates, dark passages , tea and whisky, secrets and mischievous ways …  a world in which everyone knows and known by their place. Such characters, from The Master to the Bedders  … all slightly to the downright quirky! None more so than The Dean, a triumph of imagination, he steals every scene he’s in.  And then there are the outsiders  – the police, so inconveniently tenacious, and an excitable young man with thighs … no spoilers … I’ll let Lucy tell you … this novel, as the first one, such a joy to read.