Guest Blog Post – Featuring Eric Clarke

For a second week, Esther Chilton has kindly had me as a guest on her blog – this poem (quite long for me) sums up where my short poems come from…

estherchiltonblog

I hope you’ve had a good week. It’s now time for my guest post. If you’d like to feature as a guest on my blog, please get in touch. I’m looking for stories and non-fiction pieces of up to 1500 words and poems of up to 40 lines. If you can also send me a photo and a little bit about yourself too, that would be great. Please send them to estherchilton@gmail.com

Last week, my guest writer was Eric Clarke, with his poem England – Isolated Views. To read it, click here. And here’s another one from him for you to enjoy:

A Take On Poetry

By

Eric Clarke

Beaconsfield to Marylebone

Maidenhead to Paddington

Windsor to Waterloo

lines in, and out again

Exeter from all begun

Devon left, half century on

River Thames meandering

fields beside, counties bridged

Buckinghamshire, Berkshire views

English ways, getting there

London, underground…

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Guest Blog Post – Featuring Eric Clarke

My thanks to my good friend, writer, tutor, editor, Esther Chilton for featuring me as a guest on her blog today. My poem ‘England – Isolated Views’ is a compilation of individual short poems posted March through to July – it’s a strange feeling looking back at words written of the moment in times we’re living through.

estherchiltonblog

It’s Friday and time for my guest post. If you’d like to feature as a guest on my blog, please get in touch. I’m looking for stories and non-fiction pieces of up to 1500 words and poems of up to 40 lines. If you can also send me a photo and a little bit about yourself too, that would be great. Please send them to estherchilton@gmail.com

This week’s guest writer is Eric Clarke. I first met Eric at the London Book Fair a few years ago. We’ve become good friends since then and I’ve watched with interest as his work has deservedly become recognised. Recently, Eric had his first collection of poems, Shorts, published by Potter’s Grove Press. Here’s a little bit more about him:

Eric Daniel Clarke (aka EDC Writing) is an Englishman, raised and schooled in Devon close to its Somerset and Dorset borders…

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Lost Voice

‘Lost Voice’ – remarkable writing from author Lucy Brazier, the most English voice I know…

Lucy Brazier

I have lost my voice.

I don’t know where it’s gone, all I know is the harder I try to find it, the further away it feels.

As I scrabble for the words, they vanish as mist in my mind. Like trying to grasp the memory of a dream in that twilight time before sleep and waking.

I wonder if I have used up all my words. They used to flow unbidden from places inside, sometimes deep within, other times from that bubbling layer of innovation that lies just below the surface. Stories would weave themselves unprompted and thoughts and ideas would bloom in black and white.

And now I cannot find them.

In a world where self-expression is all but demanded, I am impotent. When words are all I am, am I really anything at all?

And then there is the fear.

The fear of that demanded self-expression –…

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Throwback Friday – Not Forgot – Eric (EDC Writing)

A true story from a while ago I posted over at the Go Dog Go Cafe today…

Go Dog Go Café

Flash fiction from 2017; from a memory much further back than then:

He stands a foot from the wall, illuminated by strobe lit blobs and spheres, one hand in his pocket, the other holding a cold beer. 10 pm he’d guess, summer darkness outside lures moths to flight, rhythm finds his feet, yet too soon for moves. She takes to the floor, perfection, slight yet curved, green eyed blonde, focal point of his desire. No smile, yet politely declines the handsome, or just confident, dancing with her sister or maybe a friend. He buys a second beer, a small one, returns, his space still there a few metres from her presence. 11.30 pm checks his time, no chance, better men have tried, he moves. She turns to face his walk towards her, the beat slows, traces a smile, no words, her fingers behind his neck stroke him closer, his hands…

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Reverting to the WordPress Classic Editor

Just had to reblog this – the post of the day!

Wibble

Good morning, everyone, and a pinch and a punch for the first of the month! Today’s the day, according to WordPress, that we’re all going to be presented with the new Block Editor to use.

I’ve been in touch with WordPress Support, and they’ve explained to me how to switch back to the Classic Editor, should you wish to do this. The good news is that this is a one-time action: once you’ve switched back, you stay on the Classic Editor unless you choose to then switch to the Block Editor.

This is how you do it:

More tools & options button

In the Block Editor, look for the ‘More tools & options’ button (looks like three dots in a vertical row just to the right of the green ‘Jetpack’ symbol). Click that, then, at the bottom, click on ‘Switch to Classic Editor’.

You may then be presented with a dialog that says ‘The new…

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PorterGirl – Second Editions. Still First Class.

Ladies and gentlemen – your attention please – the PorterGirl series second editions released – new jackets, author Lucy Brazier ever stylish…

Lucy Brazier

Ladies & gentlemen – introducing the brand spanking new editions of the PorterGirl series, in association with Smashing Blouse Productions. Second editions – but still first class.

First Lady of the Keys

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As one of the most ancient and esteemed establishments of the academic elite, Old College is in for something of a shock when it appoints its very first female Deputy Head Porter. As she struggles to get to grips with this eccentric world – not to mention the polite and discrete appearance of some dead bodies – she begins to wonder just quite what she is doing here.PorterGirl – First Lady of the Keys is a quirky and, at times, laugh-out-loud funny glimpse into a world usually reserved for the upper echelons of society.Whether she is chasing after naked students, drinking copious amounts of tea or getting embroiled in nefarious deeds, Deputy Head Porter is never far from…

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Throwback Friday – ‘Greenland’ – Eric (EDC Writing)

‘Sam & Erin’s Story’ has been on hold a while as I completed ‘Shorts – a take on poetry’ – their story first saw the light of day as a mix of narrative scenes and messages – then became all messages – on re-reading I think I might change my mind again and add narrative text like this back in – your thoughts as ever welcome please…

Go Dog Go Café

This post a lengthy piece of narrative text written as part of ‘Sam & Erin’s Story’ back in September 2017 – this its first exposure at the Go Dog Go Cafe…

 …..

With hail ricocheting off the wing, backsides bouncing on their seats, her hand gripping his, painted nails digging in, not daring to breathe, let alone speak, his brain exclaims shit, how’s this thing still flying?! As wheels touch the ground and spent air is released through every orifice he strains to hear her breathless whisper. “Sorry, Sam, your fingers are bleeding.”

Sam grins as he looks at his deeply scarred hand. “When I said get a grip I didn’t mean quite so literally! At least this one is already ugly.” Amy gives his hand a kiss; a trace of Sam’s blood merges with her lipstick.

Both give a nervous laugh as the pilot nonchalantly announces, “Welcome to Kangerlussuaq…

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Creating Atmosphere In Fiction – by Esther Chilton

An excellent guest post by Esther Chilton – I’m slightly nervous writing this as Esther is my editor – a mistake here and there could create an atmosphere – but there never is with Esther – okay the odd well disguised sigh maybe!

Hugh's Views & News  

Today, I’m delighted to welcome Esther Chilton to my blog.

While I’m putting the finishing touches to my next short story collection, Esther kindly accepted my invitation to write a guest post. This is a must-read for anyone who is in the process of writing fiction, whether it is for an upcoming book, competition, for publication in a magazine, or as a blog post.  Esther gives lots of great writing advice and tips over on her blog.

#writingtips #writing #authors Image Credit: Pixabay

To be successful, a short story or novel needs to develop a strong sense of atmosphere. This draws your readers into your story so they can imagine this world you are creating. It also sets up expectations for them and gives them information about the characters they’re likely to meet in your story.

Here are some ways to help you ensure your readers feel as if they’re right there alongside your…

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